November’s Food for thought…

  • Research seeks to determine how much extra carbon dioxide can trees absorb to reduce greenhouse emissions
  • At tables of the future
  • Ministers Adopt Strategy to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants by 2030
  • The revolutionary additive to reduce cows’ methane emission
  • Virginia Tech researchers say eliminating dairy cows would have minimal impact on GHG emission

Research seeks to determine how much extra carbon dioxide can trees absorb to reduce greenhouse emissions – from ABC News.  Findings from research carried out at the Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) facility of the Birmingham Institute of Forest Research (BIFoR), and together with a similar project run by the Western Sydney University, they are the world’s two largest experiments looking at the effect of climate change on nature. Read the full article

At tables of the future – from the SDG2 Avocacy Hub website. Thoughts from Susan MacMillan, ILRI, about how despite the issues of livestock systems, they are also part of the solution as well as providing livelihoods for many. Read the article

Ministers Adopt Strategy to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants by 2030 – from IISD/SDG Knowledge Hub. Along with the many meetings taking place at COP26, Ministers from 46 countries discussed stepping up ambition and action to address climate and clean air issues, with a particular focus on methane. The CCAC will support the Global Methane Pledge’s implementation and assist all participants achieve its goal to reduce methane emissions by at least 30% by 2030. Read the full story

The revolutionary additive to reduce cows’ methane emission – from Fair Planet, Brazil. The article looks at the scientific work being undertaken around the world to find solutions and to reduce the impact of emissions from beef and dairy foods. To read the article

Virginia Tech researchers say eliminating dairy cows would have minimal impact on GHG emissions – from the Cattle Site. A team of researchers from the U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and supported Dairy Management Inc. undertook some work by way of an extension of previous research conducted in 2017 on the reduction of animals in U.S. agriculture and the associated impacts on nutrition and greenhouse gasses. Read the full article